I try to keep this blog on topic, sticking to technical posts of interest to iOS and macOS developers. So when I wanted to write about something else I set up a different blog unrelated to my business.

As some of you are aware, when I'm not working on apps I'm also a radio DJ, at KRCC in Colorado Springs, CO. If you aren't, you might still have noticed how I used to win prizes at "Stump the Experts" at Apple WWDC by identifying song. While DJing I get to listen to a ton of great music, and I wanted to write about what I'm listening to. So I'm introducing Tom Swift FM (my on-air nickname is "Tom Swift", which seemed apt for a Swift developer). I'll post about whatever great music I've been listening to lately.

I hope you'll check it out. That's all I'll say about it here.

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Later this month I'm hosting Stump 360 III: The Search for Stump, the third annual Stump 360. It's part of 360iDev in Denver. It's on August 23, 4:45pm - 6:00pm. In case you're not familiar with Stump 360, here's some possibly interesting information. Stump is sort of approximately a game with two teams, the audience and the panel. It's a quiz/trivia style event where each team poses questions to the other in the hope of stumping them. But don't take the game too seriously. I certainly don't. Ideally everyone will have some fun, and just maybe, some people will get correct answers to some of the questions. Having fun is more important than being able to recite complex technical answers from memory. The panel is made up of volunteers from…

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One of the cool things UIStackView can do for you is make it easy to dynamically update your app's user interface while it's running, with smooth animations and not a lot of code. My recent talk at iOSDevCamp DC covered some techniques. Natasha the Robot wrote a couple of great posts based on my talk, and today I'm going to talk about another unexpected (to me?) use of stack views. Animated Updates with Stack Views Stack views exist to figure out the layout constraints for their arranged subviews. But only for the stack views that are visible. It might seem obvious but stack view layouts don't consider subviews that don't appear on the screen. The great thing about this is that you can dynamically update your UI just by changing the value…

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As I mentioned in my last post, last week I did a talk at iOSDevCamp DC where I talked about UIStackView, a relatively new UIKit class that's my new favorite thing in iOS development. I'm going to cover some of the more useful things UIStackView can do in posts here, which will fall more or less into two categories: Simplified and flexible UI design, making common UI patterns easier to implement and modify. Dynamic UI updates when apps are running, including UI animations and updates triggered by size class changes. Today I'll hit point #1 above. The cool, useful thing is this: Stack views make (most of) your autolayout constraints unnecessary, for common linear UI layouts. Side by Side Comparison So let's take a look at what UIStackView…

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Last week I did a talk at iOSDevCamp DC, an annual event hosted by Luis de la Rosa. I talked about UIStackView, under the admittedly grandiose title of "Mastering UIStackView". I've used stack views for a number of things recently, as I've come to realize they're a lot more useful than a lot of introductory material might suggest. I'll be writing about some of this in the very near future, but in the meantime the excellent Natasha the Robot has already done two blog posts based on stuff that I covered: The Easy Button: A Fancy Animation with StackView Magical View Rotation with StackView Sometimes when I do a technical talk I wonder if people really took anything away from it. Other times, someone does two great blog posts based on the…

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